Science dating service

Posted by / 12-Sep-2016 02:01

Science dating service

I thought a good way to start this 40th anniversary year would be to re-release the video and share it with our current viewers.Here is the link to A Tribute to the STURP Team - 1978-2008, which runs just under 15 minutes.An e-mail with strong emotional words (e.g., excited, wonderful) led to more positive impressions than an e-mail with fewer strong emotional words (e.g., happy, fine) and resulted in nearly three out of four subjects selecting the e-mailer with strong emotional words for the fictitious dater of the opposite sex.Results for self-disclosure e-mails were complex, but indicate that levels of self-disclosure led to different impressions.Even sadder, since I produced that video, several more team members have passed, so their names are not included in the memorial at the end of the tribute.Those not included are Vernon Miller, Don Devan and Bill Mottern.

I had no idea that males demonstrate their fitness through acrobatic flips and leaps, though.

However, even more important is the fact that this year also marks the 40th anniversary of the first ever in-depth scientific examination of the Shroud of Turin by the Shroud of Turin Research Project (STURP) on October 8-13, 1978.

In commemoration of that historic event, we will be celebrating the anniversary year with some special materials in each of our regular updates and culminating with a Special STURP Update on October 8, 2018, 40 years to the day that we began our examination of the Shroud in 1978.

All the while they have to keep their skin wet to enable oxygen absorption.

We report on the results of a multi-disciplinary project (including wood identification, radiocarbon dating and strontium isotope analysis) focused on a collection of pre-Columbian wooden carvings and human remains from Pitch Lake, Trinidad.

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  1. It was spelled 'J-A-S-S.' That was dirty, and if you knew what it was, you wouldn't say it in front of ladies." The American Dialect Society named it the Word of the Twentieth Century.